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The Greenline Report

News for Your Career in the Electronics Industry

October 2007

 

Survey reveals steady U.S. hiring for 4th quarter
Abridged: Manpower Inc. MILWAUKEE, WI -- U.S. employers plan to maintain a stable, yet cautious approach toward hiring in the final quarter of 2007, according to the results of the latest Manpower Employment Outlook Survey by Manpower Inc. "It is not unexpected that U.S. employers have conservative hiring plans for the fourth quarter," said Jeffrey A. Joerres, Chairman & CEO of Manpower Inc.

The seasonally adjusted survey results show that in the majority of industry sectors the hiring pace is expected to remain steady during the final months of 2007. Of the 14,000 U.S. employers surveyed, 27% expect to increase their workforces during the fourth quarter of 2007, while 9% expect to trim their payrolls. Fifty-eight percent expect no change in the hiring pace, and 6% are undecided about their hiring plans.

"Companies that deal with producing goods are struggling, but the service sector is doing very well," said Jonas Prising, President of Manpower North America. "We can clearly see this trend in the survey results, with Services employers reporting the strongest hiring intentions for the fourth quarter, and those in the Manufacturing and Construction sectors coming in with weaker employment projections.”

American boomers embark on new midlife careers
Abridged: Miami Herald SACRAMENTO, CA -- MIAMI, FL -- A revolution may be changing the nature of work and retirement in the United States -- people who, instead of fading from the workforce in midlife, are embarking on second careers. The second half of life would thus be a source of social and individual renewal.

The notion that 50-plus Americans are an untapped resource is gaining attention. At the age of retirement, more and more baby boomers decide to begin a new career. Many of them are looking for more than a paycheck. Forty years after coming of age in the tumultuous '60s, they want meaningful work. Some even decide to go back to school in order to finally have the job they were dreaming off during their youth.

Corporations and nonprofits will have to change if they want to benefit from Boomers' talents. They don't want the hassle of certain things, like having to drive through rush-hour traffic to engage in volunteer work. For many of them, opening a business is the best way to get the flexibility and control they want. The most important thing for all boomers who embarked on a new career is to be happy with their new job.

 

Job Seekers: Put your web savvy to work
Abridged: Wall Street Journal Menlo Park, CA -- Whether seeking career advancement or scrambling in response to job cuts like those hitting the mortgage industry, many workers are hunting for new jobs. And many of them, even those who changed employers as recently as a few years ago, are finding a job marketplace transformed by the Internet -- and one where Web savvy can be critical for success.

The economic climate isn't the best: U.S. employment last month fell for the first time in four years, the Labor Department said Friday. (In reaction, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 1.9% for the day. It was down 1.8% for the week.)

Fifty-year-old Larry Stewart of Chattanooga, Tenn., says his recent job search, the first he'd had to conduct in nearly two decades, took place almost entirely online. He started by perusing the job postings online. When he found an ad for a district-manager job at a health-insurance firm, he applied by completing an online form and uploading his resume. Mr. Stewart used email to coordinate dates and times for interviews and, in preparation, studied the firm's Web site. He received a job offer by email, taking a new post at a 20% increase in salary.

Keeping your job search a secret while employed
Abridged: Wall Street Journal NEW YORK, NY -- With 47 percent of current employees searching for new jobs or planning to do so within the next year, according to Yahoo HotJobs, conducting a search in secrecy is important if job seekers don't want to jeopardize their current position or displease their higher-ups. A little discretion -- and the features online job boards offer to allow people to remain anonymous -- can help people avoid sabotaging a current position.

Attire can be a dead giveaway that an employee is interviewing elsewhere. If your company is business casual and you show up at work in a suit on days you are interviewing, it can raise red flags. For interviews that may last longer than an hour, it may be wise to take a vacation or personal day.

Candidates should also be sure to separate their job from their search. Under no circumstances should you use work e-mail or telephones to conduct your job search. Instead create a private e-mail account for a search and use a cell phone or home number on a resume. Aside from increasing your chances of being exposed, using company resources to conduct a search could rub potential hiring managers the wrong way and give the impression that you're someone willing to abuse company time.

Easy to read resumes turn into job interviews
Abridged: news-daily.com More than 70 percent of job applicants make at least one mistake on their resumes, according to an official from Clayton State University's Career Services office, who was leading a resume writing seminar.

Bridgette McDonald, an associate director of the department, said applicants commonly make the mistake of not doing a good job when they explain their previous job experiences. She said employers typically spend 5 to 10 seconds reading a resume, so applicants should find ways to quickly and effectively explain themselves to an employer

"A resume is a portrait of you," McDonald told the attendees. "It's also your advertisement. It's going to say to employers, "this is why you need to hire me and this is what I can do for you." She told students that resumes, which are simple, accurate, up-to date, clean, and easy to read, are the ones that are most likely to catch the attention of a human resources manager.

Getting a degree pays off with higher salary
Abridged: San Francisco Chronicle The federal government has recently released its latest look at how much graduates make. The basic lesson: higher degrees usually bring higher salaries. A person with a bachelor's degree earned on average 62 percent more in 2006 than a typical high school graduate, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Someone with a master's degree made 18.5 percent more than someone with a bachelor's degree.

"More education means more earning power," said bureau economist Amar Mann. The median annual salary for a high school graduate in 2006 was about $30,940, according to the bureau. For college graduates with a bachelor's degree, the median was $50,024. For those with a master's degree, it was $59,280.

Higher degrees also lessen your chances of unemployment. Just 1.1 percent of people with a professional degree - in, for example, law or medicine - were unemployed in 2006, according to the bureau. The unemployment rate for high school grads was almost 4 times as high: 4.3 percent. For people who didn't finish high school, the rate jumped to 6.8 percent.

We need your help; good people always seem to know good people - that's why we place a high value on the recommendations we receive from our candidates. If the person you refer for one of these five positions is hired we’ll send you a $250.00 gift card. For a complete list of all open jobs please visit us at http://www.greenlinegroup.net/jobs.htm

Director of Engineering – California
Successful candidate will manager and direct the engineering staff Position requires Bachelor’s degree in an Engineering discipline and seven years of progressively complex technical experience in PCB manufacturing.  Incumbent will be recognized for their achievement and technical expertise within their field. Will interface with internal and external customers. This position will be accountable for developing strategic plans and process improvements in conjunction with the Engineering Team.  Strong understanding of DFM control essential, SPC and DOE.  Three to five years of progressively responsible experience in a management/leadership role in a mfg. environment. 

Quality Engineer UK
Tasks:
Includes but not limited to: aiding in the analysis of products and processes to elaborate response to current quality issues and work towards eliminating future quality problems; responsibility over the customer complaint process including writing of corrective action reports, development of quality improvement plans; act as a liaison in planning, communicating and resolving quality issues; assist in manufacturing and engineering in identifying and eliminating root cause failures; prepare procedures related to the quality function; work the necessary hours to fulfill the business demands.

Qualifications: Must have: 2 years in Quality Engineering activities, 2 years experience in Printed circuit board manufacturing and/or assembly manufacturing environment, ASQ certification strong knowledge of ISO requirements and MIL-31032/MIL55110, good communication skills

Manager of Customer Service – China
Responsible for leading the Asian Service organization in support of all the company's products in the region's installed base. Also responsible for coordinating the support of Asian-based OEMs that sell products into other international regions.

ESSENTIAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

·         Organize customer support activities for all the company's products in Asia

·         Provide leadership and direct management of the company's customer support organizations in Asia

·         Interface with, manage, and control service subcontractors

·         Ensure the alignment of tactical Asian service activities with overall strategies and objectives of the company's Global Services organization

·         Drive the growth initiatives of the Asian services business through the marketing and support of value-added service offerings such as educational and consulting services, contract sales, used equipment sales, product upgrades, conversions, and refurbishment offerings

Manager of Customer Service – Germany
Responsible for leading the European Service organization in support of all the company's products in the region's installed base. Also responsible for coordinating the support of European-based OEMs that sell products into other international regions.

 

ESSENTIAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

·         Organize customer support activities for all the company's products in Europe

·         Provide leadership and direct management of the company's customer support organizations in Europe

·         Interface with, manage, and control service subcontractors

·         Ensure the alignment of tactical European service activities with overall strategies and objectives of the company's Global Services organization

·         Drive the growth initiatives of the European services business through the marketing and support of value-added service offerings such as educational and consulting services, contract sales, used equipment sales, product upgrades, conversions, and refurbishment offerings

Quality Manager – California
Our client has an opening for a senior level quality director that has experience maintaining certifications, writing corrective actions to departments that are violating written procedures. Candidate needs to have extensive background in PCB manufacturing and ISO in a high technology product environment. Must have strong customer interaction skills.

Please take a moment and email us with an updated resume if you have not done so recently.
resume@greenlinegroup.net

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